A crossover between Lego Starwars and Team Fortress 2
#1
I, for one, will be extremely disappointed if this doesn't make the cut for v1.0!
Reply
#2
OMG! You remembered?!

Oh where do I start? Smile

I'm a bit of a fan of the original lego starwars game from when it came out. One thing I found interesting was that the player/enemies would often (...always?) be "gibed" (blown to pieces) on "death". Normally, this is something which only occurs in fairly bloody fps games (I'm personally no fan of them, with exception for the half-life franchise, because I'm a Portal fan... and tf2). But there's something about the playfulness of the game which turned this element of failure into laughter instead of frustration and dismay over pieces of the player flying all over the screen... Meat and blood being replaced by plastic and smoke, I suspect. Wink

And then recently I tried team fortress 2 (it became free to play). And I noticed something: it wasn't yet another "war simulator" of "good guys" vs "bad guys" shooting at each other in what would in reality be only a source of tears and sadness... It was just a bunch of distinctive cartoon caricatures of "warriors", neither good or evil (well, I guess they're all on the evil side) and instead of the players shouting at each other and seeming to have a genuinely hatred towards the players of the other team, there was a bit of the same playfulness I found in lego starwars. Sure, some people would go frustrated, but others would just look at the game for what it is: complete and amusing nonsense! The teams would scramble randomly, with one side trying to protect their base from the other team that are either trying to capture control points (by literally standing on big checkpoints) or pushing a oversized bomb on a cart along a rail towards the front door of the other team's base. Pure ridiculousness, and laugher. But with a bit more blood.

So why not combine them? I give you: "Brick Fortress"! (no tm registered or so I hope. Since using "LEGO" would probably lead to lawsuits... Undecided).

An online, team-based, capture-defense, fps game with plastic mini figures in a miniature world!

Also, I might have gotten one or another ide from this video...

(Link to YT, for those not using flash)


Idea so far: there will be 4 classes (instead of 9 in tf2):
* builder: serving bother as engineer and medic (crowbar both builds and repairs both buildings and teammates), with more blueprints (cars, both auto and manual cannons, walls to block paths, the usual stuff like dispensers and teleporters, etc)
* destroyer: combination of soldier and demoman (got a rocketlauncher with selectable laser guidance and remote detonated explosives)
* warrior: kind of a demoknight/sniper combo: able to charge and attack people with a sword, plus a crossbow for (not so)long range
* ???: heavy with a more futuristic take: armed with something similar to that nuclear-driven raygun in hl (which can be charged up), plus the gravity-gun from hl2 (nice to fully utilize and demo the rigid body dynamics of ode used by the engine)

note: I have no plan on adding full sniper and spy classes (as they tend to cause a lot of annoyance).

Now this also serves as an excuse for trying to make the engine in recaged as flexible as possible. Or maybe it's the other way around: flexibility in the engine is my excuse for trying to realize this little idea. But it remains to see how much work I'll put into this. Some generic first-person character should be easy enough, but if I actually get any further and manage to add support for weapons, multiplayer and some basic mission gameplay (payload no doubtWink), then I'll slap a big "2" to the name (Brick Fortress 2).



Oh, and I got quite a few ideas for some other minigames! But I'll post more some other day; it's getting late... And I'm getting tired.Tongue
Reply
#3
Double-posting-thread-bumping...

Another reason for using lego bricks (at least for characters) is: LDraw

Which is a HUGE collections of bricks, normally used together with some editing software to design constructions. But I'm more interested in the set of bricks themselves (which covers a very significant chunk of all existing lego bricks).

The bricks that are part of the official library are under an older CC BY 2.0. The thing is: this license doesn't put conditions on derived works (except for attribution). So by exporting 3D models of the bricks that are interesting, firing up blender to optimize the polygon count, apply material properties and such, I'm pretty sure our usage of the original bricks will fall under the category of derived works, thus making it possible to apply any license wanted.

Meaning this content could be made All Permissive, and thus being compatible with the terms needed for redistribution with any distro (like the current models).
Try systemd. They said.
It'll be just as reliable as init. They said.
It'll be completely bug-free. They said.
Our monolithic windows-approach is far superior to the Unix-approach. They said.
Okay, so the codebase has grown gigantic and no one but our paid group of full-time developers who created it can maintain it and fix bugs... but it'll be fine. They said.
Okay, we'll shove it down your throat whether you like it or not. They said.

I guess it's finally time to look into GuixSD and/or devuan.

Code:
systemd-journald(195): Received SIGTERM.
systemd[1]: systemd-udevd.service has no holdoff time, scheduling restart.
systemd[1]: systemd-udevd.service failed to schedule restart job: final.target is queued, ignoring restart request for unit systemd-udevd.service
systemd[1]: Unit systemd-udevd.service entered failed state.
systemd[1]: systemd-journald.service has no holdoff time, scheduling restart.
systemd[1]: systemd-journald.service failed to schedule restart job: final.target is queued, ignoring restart request for unit systemd-journald.service
systemd[1]: Unit systemd-journald.service entered failed state.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)